tarot waite tarotMomenteel werk ik aan een tarotproject en verdiep ik me nog intenser dan anders in de symboliek van de Waite tarot. De toren stelt het einde van een donkere periode voor of zoals Waite het zegt  : ‘ Het einde van het pad van de donkere nacht van de ziel.’
Het gedicht hieronder (uit de 16de eeuw) inspireerde Waite en vele andere mystici tijdens hun zoektocht naar het ervaren van éénheid met God.

The Dark Night of the Soul

St John Of the Cross

Voor het vertaalde interview met Karen Mahony klik hier

karen mahony tarot baba studio
Karen Mahony met één van haar drie katten

Karen Mahony is no stranger in  the world of tarot. She is a designer of tarot decks,
a creative person with many skills and a popular speaker at meetings tarot.
Together with her ​​partner Alex she founded Baba Studio in 2002.

Especially for Tarot Cirkel, Karen answered a few questions.

How did tarot came in to your life?

The first time I ever heard of card reading was in a small town on the Antrim coast of Northern Ireland where two card readers had small wooden booths set up right on the rocks by a scenic cliffside walk. One of them was considered a charlatan, the other a true mage. As a small child (I must have been about seven at the time) I found the discussions about fortune telling fascinating and a little alarming! I didn’t begin using the cards seriously myself for many years after that.

What attracts you (the most) in tarot?

The Waste Land

door T.S. Eliot

                                  FOR EZRA POUND
                                IL MIGLIOR FABBRO

I. The Burial of the Dead
April is the cruellest month, breeding
Lilacs out of the dead land, mixing
Memory and desire, stirring
Dull roots with spring rain.
Winter kept us warm, covering
Earth in forgetful snow, feeding
A little life with dried tubers.
Summer surprised us, coming over the Starnbergersee
With a shower of rain; we stopped in the colonnade,
And went on in sunlight, into the Hofgarten,
And drank coffee, and talked for an hour.
Bin gar keine Russin, stamm’ aus Litauen, echt deutsch.
And when we were children, staying at the arch-duke’s,
My cousin’s, he took me out on a sled,
And I was frightened. He said, Marie,
Marie, hold on tight. And down we went.
In the mountains, there you feel free.
I read, much of the night, and go south in the winter.
What are the roots that clutch, what branches grow
Out of this stony rubbish? Son of man,
You cannot say, or guess, for you know only
A heap of broken images, where the sun beats,
And the dead tree gives no shelter, the cricket no relief,
And the dry stone no sound of water. Only
There is shadow under this red rock,
(Come in under the shadow of this red rock),
And I will show you something different from either
Your shadow at morning striding behind you
Or your shadow at evening rising to meet you;
I will show you fear in a handful of dust.
                      Frisch weht der Wind
Der Heimat zu
Mein Irisch Kind,
Wo weilest du?
“You gave me hyacinths first a year ago;
“They called me the hyacinth girl.”
—Yet when we came back, late, from the Hyacinth garden,
Your arms full, and your hair wet, I could not
Speak, and my eyes failed, I was neither
Living nor dead, and I knew nothing,
Looking into the heart of light, the silence.
Oed’ und leer das Meer.
Madame Sosostris, famous clairvoyante,
Had a bad cold, nevertheless
Is known to be the wisest woman in Europe,
With a wicked pack of cards. Here, said she,
Is your card, the drowned Phoenician Sailor,
(Those are pearls that were his eyes. Look!)
Here is Belladonna, the Lady of the Rocks,
The lady of situations.
Here is the man with three staves, and here the Wheel,
And here is the one-eyed merchant, and this card,
Which is blank, is something he carries on his back,
Which I am forbidden to see. I do not find
The Hanged Man. Fear death by water.

The blog before me is the Ace of Stars Tarot by Shonna Hill

The theme of this Tarot Blog Hop, celebrating Ostara 2013 is

 Dancing Between Light and Darkness

I wot that I hanged on the windy tree
nights all nine,
wounded by a spear and given to Óðen,
myself to myself,
on that tree,
of which no one knows from what roots it rises.

The sacrifice of Odin (1895) by Lorenz Frølich
The sacrifice of Odin (1895) by Lorenz Frølich

 

Odin, the mighty Norwegian god, All-Father to the whole of creation, divine and human. In the minds of many people today, the most popular image of  Odin is that of a god of battle and of death. However traditionally he was also, if not more, linked to knowledge.

Among his gifts to us was the greatest of all: the gift of writing. Like the Egyptian god Thoth he is therefore also the god of magic.

To accomplish this, Odin self-sacrificed himself by hanging himself upside down in the World Tree, the gigantic  ash Yggdrasil. He reached for the runes under him and obtaining them he fell out of the tree.

 

Do what thou wilt shall be the whole of the Law.

Introducing Crowley

Studying the occult without stumbling on Crowley is almost impossible.
He left a distinguished mark on spirituality and the occult as we experience it today.
Even if many don’t realize by far, his spiritual legacy is all around.
Words are somewhat insufficient to introduce to you this self called greatest magician of the 20th century. Let me quote the quote Stephen J. King used in his article contribution in Nightmare Paintings :